Posts tagged "Greenville News"

Senate Continues to Approve Bill to Expand Mental Health Courts

August 27th, 2015 Posted by Advocacy, Articles, Media, News Commentary, Published Media, Stories of Hope 0 thoughts on “Senate Continues to Approve Bill to Expand Mental Health Courts”

March 27, 2015

mhc-bill-paton-quoteYesterday the SC Senate granted a second reading of the bill S.426, the Mental Health Court Program Act, allowing it to move further into the legislation process. The vote was 40-0 in favor of passing the bill. This is a major step in getting this bill passed in the SC Senate! The bill will be going to a third reading in the Senate probably sometime next week, and after that, it will move on to the House of Representatives. This is an exciting time, and it’s thanks to everyone who contacted their senators to tell them to push forward with this bill. Now we will need to begin to push forward this bill in the SC House of Representatives so that they will be aware of how the Mental Health Court Program Act will benefit the state, and for them to support it! You can find your local house members by clicking here–we will have more information on this soon. New Balance Baskets Femme Thank you to everyone again for your support on this bill! SC is moving forward to mental health reform!

Read the full article in the Greenville News

Currently, three mental health courts operate in Greenville, Columbia and Charleston. Grants for their operation ran out years ago but they have continued to operate, officials say. soldes newbalance Two other courts have closed in recent years due to lack of funding. “I’m overwhelmed,” said Paton Blough, a Greenville mental health advocate who proposed the bill last year. “It’s a bill that I believe will save lives, make the community safer and save taxpayers money.” Sen. Vincent Sheheen, a Camden Democrat and the bill’s sponsor, asked the Senate afterward to thank Blough for his work on the bill. Sheheen’s bill doesn’t include funding but he has said he hopes to eventually find money in the budget to assist the courts. solde newbalance map The bill was amended to prohibit participation by violent offenders and to require that victims be notified when offenders enter the program. The legislation does not mandate mental health courts but instead creates a statewide program with the provision that solicitors who accept state dollars for such courts must create them within six months. “It is purely optional for the solicitors,” Sen. acheter newbalance Shane Massey, an Edgefield Republican, told the Senate. newbalance pas cher The programs under the bill are operated by each judicial circuit’s solicitor but allows those already in existence that might be operated by a probate judge under a prior court order to continue.

Read the full article in the Greenville News

Read this full article on the WLTX 19 Website

The State Senate voted 40-0 in favor of a bill Thursday that could expand mental health courts across the state. Mental health courts divert those with mental health issues away from the criminal justice system. Mental health advocate Paton Blough went through the program and has been pushing for this bill. “We’ve worked so hard to get to this point, and I’m just so thankful to see all the senators working together to get meaningful legislation passed that will help save lives,” Blough said. “To be a part of it just feels overwhelming.” Senators have also been passionate about getting this bill passed. Chaussures Homme New Balance Sen. Vincent Sheheen said after seeing the current system for patients with mental illness, he wanted a change. “Folks who were just mentally ill were just locked up for months at a time,” Sen. Sheehen said. “When I saw that kind of human tragedy, I looked for a solution, and I saw that in some few counties, mental health courts have been making a difference. This bill will allow mental health courts to be established in every community in South Carolina.” The bill will now be read in the Senate for final approval, which is expected to take place next Tuesday.

Senate Gets Bill Expanding Mental Health Courts

August 18th, 2015 Posted by Advocacy, Articles, Media, News Commentary, Published Media, Stories of Hope 0 thoughts on “Senate Gets Bill Expanding Mental Health Courts”

March 18th, 2015

Senate Judiciary Panel Passes Mental Health Courts Bill! Yesterday was a major step for mental health reform in South Carolina! The SC Senate Judiciary Committee voted 23-0 for the Bill S.426, the Mental Health Court Program Act, to move forward to the SC House. new balance pas cher This is a crucial piece of legislation that will help reduce the number of mentally ill individuals incarcerated in state prisons, while diverting them to appropriate mental health services. This bill passing the SC Senate yesterday was thanks to not only the efforts of Paton Blough and other mental health advocates and local politicians, but also everyone who contacted their senators to encourage them to support the Mental Health Court Program Act. Thank you for your support now and in the future as this bill moves through the legislative process!

Read the full article about the vote in the Greenville News.

The Senate Judiciary Committee today voted unanimously to approve a bill to expand mental health courts in the state, sending the proposal to the full Senate. Sen. vente de newbalance Shane Massey, an Edgefield Republican, said the bill establishes a framework for a statewide system that is already being used in several judicial circuits. “These things have been very popular and successful in communities where they are now,” he said. solde newbalance map Mental health courts divert mentally ill offenders away from the criminal justice system and into treatment programs, much as drug courts do for drug offenders. new balance femme pas cher Currently, three mental health courts operate in Greenville, Columbia and Charleston. Grants for their operation ran out years ago but they have continued to operate, officials say. new balance pas cher 2018 Two other courts have closed in recent years due to lack of funding. new balance 2018 “I think this is a huge first step for the Senate to acknowledge mental health reform in our state,” said Paton Blough, a Greenville mental health advocate who has spent a year pushing for the legislation.

Climber Scales Table Rock Daily to Push Mental Health Court Bill

August 15th, 2015 Posted by Advocacy, Articles, Media, News Commentary, Published Media, Video 0 thoughts on “Climber Scales Table Rock Daily to Push Mental Health Court Bill”

April 15th, 2015

Paton and Rehinge made the front page of the Greenville News today with a wonderful article written by Liv Osby and photos taken by Heidi Heilbrunn. The article covers Paton’s recent journeys up Table Rock in order to push for SC House support for S.426, the Mental Health Court Program Act. This article has great exposure for this bill, and will help bring the issue more into the light in the Upstate. You can learn more about how to support the Mental Health Court Program Act here. soldes newbalance chaussures

Read the full article on the Greenville News website

day-05-01In 2006 after he was arrested on nonviolent charges, Blough went through mental health court. Though he dealt with a couple of issues since then, he said, he credits the experience with helping him come to grips with his illness. He got support from the National Alliance on Mental Illness, the right medication and therapy, he said. And for the past five years, he’s been an advocate for people with mental illness. The daily climb up Table Rock and back, which he said takes roughly three hours, is the latest effort in that advocacy. Blough starts out early in the morning on the trek, which begins with a gentle slope along a creek flanked by large mossy rocks before becoming more rugged and elevated in some sections. “Parts of it are pretty easy,” said the stay-at-home father of six, “though it’s steep in some places and 2,000 vertical feel and a little over 3 miles.” Sometimes he’s joined by supporters or his children. He believes he can continue until the bill becomes law. “I recognize I can’t keep it up for a year or whatever,” he said. new balance pas cher “But I think I can keep going.” The bill doesn’t mandate the courts, but it creates a statewide program with the provision that solicitors who take state dollars for such courts must create them within six months. While it doesn’t include any funding, its sponsor Sen. acheter newbalance Vincent Sheheen has said he hopes that money will be found in the budget at some point to help. Blough says that although it comes with no funds, he considers it a leadership bill. “I can’t say there will be a mental health court in every circuit in the next 12 months, but I think this is significant,” he said. “If it works, there’s no reason why we shouldn’t be expanding it in our state.”

Judge Debora Faulkner of Greenville County Probate Court said mental health court is successful because it costs far less than imprisoning someone and it turns their lives around. Since it began, it has accepted 84 participants, she said, and 55 have graduated. There are now eight active participants. “It’s a way to not only be prudent with tax dollars, but to get people the help that they need and out of that revolving door,” she said. “Those individuals are no longer in the criminal justice system. They are productive members of society.” Mental health courts operate in Greenville, Charleston and Columbia. Greenville’s began with a grant in 2005, Faulkner said. But for years it’s been operating without any funding because officials believe so much in it. Probate pays the judge’s time, she said, and other services are provided by Greenville Mental Health and Piedmont Mental Health employees. soldes newbalance “It’s a wonderful program. new balance Homme pas cher It’s a savings for the taxpayer, it keeps the jail population down, and I can’t tell you how grateful I am to see the results,” she said. “They’re all trying so hard. I saw someone have their very first paycheck. And another graduate who has gone on and gotten a master’s in social work.” Under the system, the solicitor selects the participants, who must meet certain criteria, like being charged with nonviolent offenses such as public disorderly or property crimes and have no past convictions for violent crimes, Faulkner said. They must attend mental health court weekly along with seeing a case manager and medical professionals, she said. They are also subject to random drug testing and can be terminated if they are rearrested or otherwise violate terms of the program. And they’re linked to community resources so they can find other help they might need, like employment and housing, she said.

House Gives Key Approval to Mental Health Courts Bill

August 13th, 2015 Posted by Articles, Media, News Commentary, Published Media 0 thoughts on “House Gives Key Approval to Mental Health Courts Bill”

May 13th, 2015

Tim Smith wrote a nice piece in the Greenville News this morning about the SC House passing bill S.426, the Mental Health Court Program Act. This is an exciting victory in South Carolina, and we hope to see many more in the coming months and years!

Read the full article in the Greenville News

The House gave key approval Tuesday to a bill to expand the state’s mental health courts. New Balance Baskets The 98-2 vote came after no debate. acheter newbalance After a final reading, the bill will head to Gov. new balance 2018 Nikki Haley. acheter newbalance Mental health courts divert mentally ill offenders away from the criminal justice system and into treatment programs, much as drug courts do for drug offenders. new balance sitemap Currently, three mental health courts operate in Greenville, Columbia and Charleston. Grants for their operation ran out years ago but they have continued to operate, officials say. soldes newbalance Two other courts have closed in recent years due to lack of funding. soldes newbalance chaussures “It’s nice to see both bodies working together for the greater good of our state,” said Paton Blough, a Greenville mental health advocate who proposed the bill last year [….] “Hopefully, this is the beginning of years of mental health reform to come.” Blough and other supporters for the bill, including Sen. Vincent Sheheen, a Camden Democrat who authored the bill, have argued the legislation would save lives and taxpayers’ dollars.

State urged to drop appeal of inmate mental health ruling

August 16th, 2014 Posted by Advocacy, Media, News Commentary 0 thoughts on “State urged to drop appeal of inmate mental health ruling”

January 16, 2014

Paton Blough and Dr. newbalance 2018 James Hayes, the president of the state board for NAMI, were interviewed by the Greenville News about their petition to stop South Carolina’s appeal against Judge Baxley’s ruling on mental illness in the state’s prisons. newbalance 2018 You can sign the petition yourself as well: sign the petition.

You can read the full article on Greenville News Online

COLUMBIA — A Greenville mental health advocate has collected more than 100 signatures from lawmakers, County Council members, mental health officials and others asking that the state drop its appeal of a judge’s order last week that the prison system develop a plan to improve its treatment of inmates who have serious mental illness. soldes newbalance Paton Blough of Greenville, a mental health advocate who founded the website rehinge. chaussures new balance com, said he believes the state can only effectively focus on improving its care of the mentally ill in prison when it stops fighting Judge Michael Baxley’s ruling. Dr. newbalance pas cher James Hayes of Greenville, president of the state board for the National Alliance on Mental Illness, signed the petition and also said the state should drop the appeal. soldes new balance chaussures “If we appeal this, it will be one more reason not to do some meaningful reform,” he told The Greenville News. acheter newbalance “It’s critically important that our prisoners with mental illness get the proper care.

More Aid Urged for Mental Health

August 13th, 2014 Posted by Advocacy, Media, News Commentary 0 thoughts on “More Aid Urged for Mental Health”

Advocates rally for mental health improvements

March 13, 2014

An outpouring of over 100 supporters for mental health reform in the state of South Carolina occurred yesterday on the steps of the Statehouse. newbalance pas cher Mental health advocates and leaders from around the state met in the capital to advocate for solid, lasting mental health improvements. Local and state political officials showed up as well to show their support for reform. new balance 2018 The time for change in the state of South Carolina is now. acheter newbalance en ligne

Read the Full Article on The Greenville News Site

Tyler Pearson, a member of Gateway in Greenville, an agency providing programs for those in recovery from mental illness, says he enjoys mental health rallies because they show support for those in recovery. “It means a lot,” he said Wednesday, minutes after a rally concluded on the Statehouse steps. “It’s a great opportunity.” Pearson was among more than 100 people, including state and local officials, mental health professionals, friends and family members of those suffering from mental illness and those in recovery who gathered to hear lawmakers and state officials talk about the importance of mental health and plans they have for improving the system. acheter newbalance “We are here today to challenge our leaders and to educate them on the systemic failures of our broken institutions, and to encourage them to take action,” said Paton Blough, a Greenville mental health advocate. soldes newbalance “We’re here to come together and realize just how bad the mental health crisis is in South Carolina, and how much we desperately need more than lip service from our leaders.” Blough and others, including some lawmakers, said they are watching the state Department of Corrections in the wake of a judge’s 45-page order in January finding the agency had violated the constitutional rights of mentally ill prisoners in horrific ways.

Paton Blough of Rehinge also spoke at the rally, offering a compassionate and impassioned speech about the mentally ill in our country. newbalance chaussures Paton talks about his history of mental illness and how he is working for reform in South Carolina. soldes newbalance chaussures Paton encouraged the attendees to stand up and contact their local legislatures to request that they too work towards mental health reform.

Lawmakers Look to Expand Mental Health Courts

August 12th, 2014 Posted by Advocacy, Media, News Commentary 0 thoughts on “Lawmakers Look to Expand Mental Health Courts”

Lawmakers look to expand mental health courts

March 12, 2014

A number of lawmakers have begun looking at the possibility of expanding mental health courts in South Carolina. newbalance 2018 This a tremendous step forward for mental health reform in SC’s Corrections System if more mental health courts are opened in the state. acheter newbalance en ligne Paton Blough has also been working to get these changes implemented. Paton worked to get information for Tim Smith from the Greenville News to make this article happen.

Read the Full Article on The Greenville News Site

Some state lawmakers are looking favorably at the idea of expanding mental health courts in the state as a tool to divert mentally ill defendants from jails or prisons where they cost taxpayers millions of dollars to house and don’t receive the treatment they need before their release. newbalance 2018 pas cher The state currently operates mental health courts in Greenville, Columbia and Charleston, offering those suffering mental illness a chance to avoid jail or prison time. Such programs, which operate like the state’s drug courts, not only can channel the mentally ill to better treatment options, advocates say, they also can save governments money that would be spent on jail or prison costs. newbalance pas cher “The court is quite effective and really good,” 13th Circuit Solicitor Walt Wilkins of Greenville told The Greenville News. newbalance pas cher “I’m a big advocate for it.” House Majority Leader Bruce Bannister of Greenville said lawmakers should look at expanding the mental health court after the success of drug courts.

Prisons Department: Almost $900K Spent Defending Lawsuit

August 12th, 2014 Posted by Media, News Commentary 0 thoughts on “Prisons Department: Almost $900K Spent Defending Lawsuit”

February 12, 2014

South Carolina has spent almost $900,000 on defending the Department of Corrections for their mistreatment of mentally ill inmates. Judge Baxley has already ruled for the state to develop a plan to improve the state’s handling of mentally ill prisoners, but the state is currently trying to appeal this ruling—spending more and more tax payer money to not correct the problem. new balance 2018 pas cher Help us fight back against this appeal by signing our petition! You can also take the time to read Rehinge’s mental health reform proposed changes to the SC Department of Corrections.

Read the Full Article on the Greenville News Website

COLUMBIA — The state has spent almost $900,000 with a private law firm since 2005, defending the Department of Corrections against a lawsuit asking for better treatment of inmates with serious mental illness, the agency has confirmed. acheter newbalance en ligne Circuit Judge Michael Baxley last month found that the state’s prison system has repeatedly violated the rights of the seriously mentally ill, in some cases resulting in their deaths, and ordered the agency to develop a plan of improvements within six months. acheter newbalance His 45-page order included individual horror stories, including cases in which inmates were placed in solitary for years, strapped into restraining chairs in painful positions and left naked and in filth in cold, empty cells. new balance sitemap Sen. acheter newbalance en ligne Karl Allen, a Greenville lawyer and a member of the Senate Corrections and Penology Committee, said the amount spent on defending against the suit is “almost borderline ridiculous.”

Later in the article, Paton Blough was interviewed by the Greenville News:

Paton Blough, a Greenville mental health advocate, had asked the prison system for the amount it spent defending itself from the lawsuit. soldes newbalance chaussures “I think it’s a tragic waste,” he said of the money spent.

Haley Needs to Address Treatment of Inmates

August 10th, 2014 Posted by Advocacy, Articles, Media, Published Media 0 thoughts on “Haley Needs to Address Treatment of Inmates”

Posted in the Letter to the Editor section of the Greenville News on February 09, 2014

I am somewhat appalled at the lack of response from Gov. Chaussures Homme New Balance Nikki Haley after Judge Michael Baxley highlighted the way our Department of Corrections has been abusing the severely mentally ill in our prisons. Gov. chaussures newbalance pas cher Haley had the opportunity during her State of the State Address to mention these issues along with a plan to remedy this situation but instead decided to remain silent. newbalance 2018 She has also yet to respond to a letter signed by over 300 of her constituents and over a dozen elected officials asking her to drop the appeal that was immediately mentioned after the ruling came down. Judge Baxley highlighted in his 45-page ruling how some inmates with severe psychotic disorders have been in solitary confinement for years, and in tat least one case where a man died with rotting food trays surrounding him. chaussures newbalance pas cher Judge Baxley has given the state six months to come up with a plan to make the necessary changes. soldes newbalance chaussures It’s time we all wake up to the fact that we need to invest in our mental health system in this state to avoid the higher fiscal and human cost down the road. new balance femme pas cher The real solution is to come up with a plan that would stop the vicious, expensive cycle of why the mentally ill end up in prisons in the first place. acheter newbalance If we could stop 3,000 severely mentally ill from being incarcerated we would save over $52 million annually in the Corrections costs alone.

Judge: Prisons Mistreat Mentally Ill

August 9th, 2014 Posted by Advocacy, Media, News Commentary 0 thoughts on “Judge: Prisons Mistreat Mentally Ill”

January 09, 2014

Read the full article in the Greenville News.

COLUMBIA — The state’s prison system has failed its inmates who have serious mental health illness, according to a scathing, 45-page ruling by a state judge who detailed cases in which inmates were placed in solitary for years, put naked into restraining chairs in painful positions and left naked and in filth in cold, empty cells. newbalance chaussures Circuit Judge Michael Baxley ruled Wednesday that the South Carolina Department of Corrections had violated the constitutional rights of prisoners with serious mental illness. soldes newbalance The agency late Wednesday issued a three-sentence statement saying it would appeal Baxley’s decision. NEW BALANCE en France “Mental health is not just a corrections’ problem, it’s a national problem that all sectors of society are working to address,” the agency said in its statement. new balance sitemap The agency didn’t address any of the specific allegations.

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  • “It has been one of my greatest rewards as NAMI Greenville, SC Program Director to see your recovery from when we first met to your award as NAMI South Carolina’s Recovery Person of the Year to your appearance on the same stage with author Pete Early. I hope your book is every bit as successful as his has been.”

    Brian Lewis
    • Fletcher Mann
    • Program Director NAMI Greenville, SC
  • “It’s incredible. If you aren’t sure, always go for Cast. I don’t always clop, but when I do, it’s because of Cast. I made back the purchase price in just 48 hours!”

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