Posts tagged "Jail"

It’s Outrageous: Jails and Prisons Are No Place to Treat Mental Illness; Just Ask Paton Blough

August 22nd, 2015 Posted by Advocacy, Articles, Media, Published Media 1 thought on “It’s Outrageous: Jails and Prisons Are No Place to Treat Mental Illness; Just Ask Paton Blough”

May 22nd, 2015

The Huffington Post has published a piece on the cruelty and injustice in US prisons towards inmates with mental illnesses. soldes newbalance chaussures Paton is featured in the article where he talks about his experiences with the justice system and prisons as a person with bipolar. acheter newbalance The article and Paton also takes the time to talk about CIT training and how it can help aid law enforcement when dealing with mentally ill individuals.

You can read the full article on the Huffington Post website.

Human Rights Watch has released a report, Callous and Cruel, on the “unnecessary, excessive, and even malicious force” used in jails and prison to control inmates with mental illness. newbalance 2018 pas cher It’s an issue that NAMI has long been concerned with, except that it’s more than an issue or a concern. It’s an outrage that should shock the conscience of America and we need your help to change it. People unfortunately often end up in jail or prison when they don’t get effective treatment for mental illness. vente de newbalance In another report this year, Incarceration’s Front Door, the Vera Institute of Justice found that more than two million people with mental illness are booked into county jails alone, but as many as 80 percent don’t get treatment after they arrive.

Better outcomes include recovery and wellness.. NAMI South Carolina leader Paton Blough’s story serves as inspiration. acheter newbalance At the age of 26, he was jailed after onset of a manic episode. New Balance Baskets Femme Over three years he was arrested six times and every time, he was convinced police intended to murder him. He received two felony convictions for actions while incarcerated — spitting on a guard and threatening a public official. new balance femme pas cher Financially he was ruined. He lost his home in foreclosure, his marriage and contact with his children. As part of recovery, Paton had to overcome the stigma he himself internalized. His actions weren’t a reflection of bad character, but instead medical illness. Today, he helps train police officers for CIT programs.

Advocacy Alert for the Mental Health Court Program Act

August 13th, 2015 Posted by Advocacy, Articles, Media, News Commentary, Published Media, Video 0 thoughts on “Advocacy Alert for the Mental Health Court Program Act”

March 13th, 2015

An article and video published yesterday by WYFF News Channel 4 discusses the Mental Health Court Program Act and SC’s need for it. The article features Paton Blough and Senator Larry Martin of Pickens discussing the necessity of the bill in the state. Bill S.426 (formerly titled S.209), the Mental Health Court Program Act, is a bill designed to treat mentally ill criminals, rather than incarcerate them for actions that are often outside their control. This bill has been a crucial bi-partisan effort by Paton Blough and a number of SC politicians like Senator Vincent Sheheen (D) and Senator Larry Martin (R). You can watch the video on the WYFF Channel 4 website.

You can help us out in fighting for the Mental Health Court Program Act as well!

You can help us to fight for the passing of this bill by contacting the SC Senate Judiciary Committee! By contacting the following senators, you can encourage them to support S.426, the Mental Health Court Program Act in the Senate Judiciary Committee. By showing these senators your support for this bill, you are telling South Carolina that we NEED mental health courts and mental health reform in the state. Following is a list of the SC senators currently sitting on the Senate Judiciary Committee along with their contact information. Now is the time to act for mental health reform! Not sure what to say when you contact these senators? You can use this example letter/speech to help yourself out.

2015 Senate Judiciary Committee

Larry A. Martin (Chairman) SRulesComm@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6610 Room 101 Gressette Bldg. newbalance pas cher Dist. 2 – Pickens Lee Bright LeeBright@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6008 Room 602 Gressette Bldg. Dist. No. 12 – Greenville & Spartanburg George E. “Chip” Campsen, III ChipCampsen@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6340 Room 305 Gressette Bldg. Dist. 43 – Berkeley, Charleston & Collecton Creighton B. Coleman CreightonColeman@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6132 Room 508 Gressette Bldg. Chaussures NEW BALANCE Dist.17-Chester, Fairfield & York Ronnie A. Sabb RonnieSabb@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6032 Room 504 Gressette Bldg. Dist.32-Berkeley, Florence, Georgetown, Horry & Williamsburg Thomas D. Chaussures New Balance “Tom” Corbin TomCorbin@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6100 Room 501 Gressette Bldg. Dist. 5 – Greenville & Spartanburg Chauncey K. Gregory GregGregory@scsenate.gov 803-212-6024 Room 606 Gressette Bldg. Dist. 16 – Lancaster & York Cos. Greg Hembree GregHembree@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6016 Room 604 Gressette Bldg. Dist. 28 – Dillon & Horry A. Shane Massey ShaneMassey@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6024 Room 606 Gressette Bldg. Dist. 25 – Aiken, Edgefield, Lexington, McCormick & Saluda Cos. Luke A. Rankin SethicsComm@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6410 Room 205 Gressette Bldg. Dist. 33 – Horry Katrina Frye Shealy KatrinaShealy@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6108 Room 502 Gressette Bldg. Dist. 23- Lexington Paul Thurmond PaulThurmond@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6172 Room 513 Gressette Bldg. Dist. 41 – Charleston & Dorchester Ross Turner RossTurner@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6148 Room 512 Gressette Bldg. Dist. 8 – Greenville Tom Young, Jr. TomYoung@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6124 Room 506 Gressette Bldg. Dist. 24 – Aiken Sean Bennett SeanBennett@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6116 Room 601 Gressette Bldg. Dist. 7 – Berkeley, Charleston & Dorchester C. Bradley Hutto BradHutto@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6140 Room 510 Gressette Bldg. Dist. 40 – Allendale, Bamberg, Barnwell,Colleton, Hampton & Orangeburg Kevin L. Johnson KevinJohnson@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6048 Room 612 Gressette Bldg. Dist. 36 – Clarendon, Darlington, Florence & Sumter Gerald Malloy GeraldMalloy@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6172 Room 513 Gressette Bldg. Dist. 29 – Chesterfield, Darlington, Lee & Marlboro J. Thomas McElveen, III ThomasMcElveen@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6132 Room 508 Gressette Bldg. Dist. 35 – Kershaw, Lee, Richland & Sumter John L. Scott, Jr. JohnScott@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6124 Room 506 Gressette Bldg. acheter newbalance Dist. new balance sitemap 19 – Richland Karl B. Allen KarlAllen@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6040 Room 610 Gressette Bldg. Dist. 7 – Greenville Shane R. Martin ShaneMartin@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6100 Room 501 Gressette Bldg. Dist.13 – Greenville, Spartanburg & Union Marlon E. Kimpson marlonkimpson@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6056 Room 613 Gressette Bldg. Dist.

S.426, the Mental Health Court Program Act Passes the SC House!

August 12th, 2015 Posted by Advocacy, Media 0 thoughts on “S.426, the Mental Health Court Program Act Passes the SC House!”

May 12th, 2015

Exciting news today as the Mental Health Court Program Act has passed the SC House! Today, bill S.426 received a second reading in the SC House of Representatives, and will move on to a third reading before being presented to Governor Nikki Haley to be signed into law! The Mental Health Court Program Act will work towards all 46 counties in South Carolina having a mental health court program, which will help save the lives of mentally ill individuals who by providing a system that diverts mentally ill offenders to appropriate treatment programs instead of jails. new balance pas cher This is a huge step forward for mental health reform in our state. soldes newbalance Paton and Rehinge have been working hard towards getting this bill passed, and your efforts of contacting your local legislature politicians has been invaluable as well! We’re looking forward to this bill being signed into law soon! Quote from SC Representative Dan Hamilton

The SC House just passed S.426 which provides a system to divert mentally ill offenders to appropriate treatment rather than incarceration. Chaussures Homme New Balance Kudos to Paton Blough for his effective citizen-lobbyist effort to get this bill passed. new balance 2018 It now goes to the Governor.

Quote from SC Senator Vincent Sheheen

Our Mental Health Court Bill just passed the House of Representatives! This will help the mentally ill get the treatment they need while saving our costs of incarceration. New Balance Baskets Femme So thankful for all the bipartisan support.

Paton’s Presentation at the Riley Institute

August 7th, 2015 Posted by Advocacy, Speaking Events 0 thoughts on “Paton’s Presentation at the Riley Institute”

Here is Paton’s presentation at the Riley Institute last week. new balance pas cher He had the honor of speaking along side of others involved with criminal justice system in SC. newbalance 2018 Together they discussed experiences and possibilities for improving SC’s justice and prison system,

Paton Speaking Live in DC for Stepping Up

August 5th, 2015 Posted by Advocacy, Speaking Events 0 thoughts on “Paton Speaking Live in DC for Stepping Up”

May 5th, soldes newbalance 2015

Paton is Speaking Up today alongside of US Senator Al Franken and US Representative Patrick Kennedy and other mental health speakers! Mental health is an issue where all political sides can come together and find mental health treatments and alternatives to jail for people with mental illnesses. chaussures new balance

You can view this event live on Stepping Up’s stream!


Broadcast live streaming video on Ustream Stepping Up is a national initiative designed to push counties nationwide to work on access to mental health treatment and alternatives to jail for people with mental illnesses. NAMI is working with a powerful coalition of national organizations, New Balance Homme including the Council of State Governments Justice Center, chaussures newbalance pas cher the National Association of Counties, the American Psychiatric Foundation and numerous law enforcement, new balance femme pas cher mental health and substance abuse organizations. New Balance Baskets The initiative will challenge county, NEW BALANCE en France state and local leaders to work together to find solutions that work for the local community. Counties will be asked to follow a step-by-step process to build partnerships, assess current practices and develop a plan to implement research-based programs and services.

Crime & Punishment – Paton Speaking at the Riley Institute Summer Series

August 3rd, 2015 Posted by Advocacy, Speaking Events 0 thoughts on “Crime & Punishment – Paton Speaking at the Riley Institute Summer Series”

July 3rd, 2015

On July 28th, Paton will be speaking at Straight Talk SC, Crime and Punishment: Thinking Outside the Cell, a summer series of presentations put on by the Riley Institute at Furman University, SC. Chaussures New Balance On the 28th, session moderator Mark Quinn will host a conversation with community members and law enforcement officers looking at the challenges facing police and the communities which they serve. soldes newbalance chaussures Paton will be among the presenters on this day where he will talk about being arrested and sent to prison due to actions related to Bipolar I Disorder. Chaussures NEW BALANCE He will also talk about his recovery work through advocacy for mental health reform, such as pushing for the passing of the Mental Health Court Program Act, and teaching CIT training to local law enforcement. chaussures newbalance pas cher

From the Riley Institute’s Website

It is clear that something is broken in today’s criminal justice system. new balance sitemap The massive growth in American prisons over the last four decades has burdened tax payers, overcrowded the prisons, and devastated vulnerable communities. new balance pas cher Strong economic arguments as well as compelling compassionate reasons exist for why we can no longer maintain the status quo.

Mental Health Court Program Act Passes!

August 2nd, 2015 Posted by Advocacy, Media 0 thoughts on “Mental Health Court Program Act Passes!”

June 2nd, 2015

Exciting news! The Mental Health Court Program Act, bill S.426, was signed into law by Governor Nikki Haley! This a great victory for South Carolina and mental health reform. The Mental Health Court Program Act will help establish a mental health court program in every county in the state, which will help divert indicted mentally ill people to appropriated mental health programs instead of jails and prisons. new balance Homme pas cher We still have a long way to go for mental health reform, but for now we can celebrate this great victory! A HUGE thank you to everyone that helped us get this bill passed! Your calls, emails and support helped make this law a reality; you deserve the greatest thanks for your efforts. Here’s a word of thanks from Paton: I just received a call from the Governors office that S.426 The Mental Health Court Program Act was officially signed into law by Governor Haley…. acheter newbalance en ligne A special huge thanks and congratulations to everyone who wrote emails, made phone calls, shared posts etc to make this happen. acheter newbalance I am especially thankful for Vincent Sheheen who authored the bill and for Senator Shane Massey who kept it going with strength. newbalance 2018 We also could not have done this with out all the help from the media! Thank you Greenville News, Wyff 4, WSPA, WORD Radio, WLTX Columbia , The State News, The Greenville Journal, The Washington Times, The AP, Eric G. Wood, Liz Lohuis Stanislawski , April Morris, Tim Smith, Liv Osby, Gordon Dill, and Joyce Koh. chaussures newbalance pas cher Finally thank you is well deserved for the support of Marie Limnios Dunn-Blough and her team from Redhype with the point person being the fabulous designer, copywriter and web guru Mika Hearn.

State urged to drop appeal of inmate mental health ruling

August 16th, 2014 Posted by Advocacy, Media, News Commentary 0 thoughts on “State urged to drop appeal of inmate mental health ruling”

January 16, 2014

Paton Blough and Dr. newbalance 2018 James Hayes, the president of the state board for NAMI, were interviewed by the Greenville News about their petition to stop South Carolina’s appeal against Judge Baxley’s ruling on mental illness in the state’s prisons. newbalance 2018 You can sign the petition yourself as well: sign the petition.

You can read the full article on Greenville News Online

COLUMBIA — A Greenville mental health advocate has collected more than 100 signatures from lawmakers, County Council members, mental health officials and others asking that the state drop its appeal of a judge’s order last week that the prison system develop a plan to improve its treatment of inmates who have serious mental illness. soldes newbalance Paton Blough of Greenville, a mental health advocate who founded the website rehinge. chaussures new balance com, said he believes the state can only effectively focus on improving its care of the mentally ill in prison when it stops fighting Judge Michael Baxley’s ruling. Dr. newbalance pas cher James Hayes of Greenville, president of the state board for the National Alliance on Mental Illness, signed the petition and also said the state should drop the appeal. soldes new balance chaussures “If we appeal this, it will be one more reason not to do some meaningful reform,” he told The Greenville News. acheter newbalance “It’s critically important that our prisoners with mental illness get the proper care.

SC Could Expand Mental Health Court Program

August 15th, 2014 Posted by Advocacy, Media, News Commentary, Speaking Events, Video 0 thoughts on “SC Could Expand Mental Health Court Program”

April 15, 2014

Paton Blough of Rehinge spoke in front of the Greenville County Delegation last night on the topic of mental health courts. Paton is pushing for South Carolina to adopt more mental health courts in each county of the state. new balance pas cher This expansion of mental health courts would reduce recidivism rates of mentally ill inmates and also save the state millions of dollars. new balance sitemap

Watch and Read the Full Article at WSPA News Channel 7

A Greenville mental health advocate spoke with lawmakers Monday night to raise support for more mental health courts in South Carolina. Chaussures NEW BALANCE Right now, there are three in Greenville, Richland and Charleston counties. vente de newbalance The courts allow non-violent mentally ill offenders to meet with a judge and sign up for treatment.

Paton Blough graduated from Greenville’s mental health court several years ago. new balance Homme pas cher “I believe the program was a big part of my recovery without a doubt,” Blough said. solde newbalance map Blough faced some misdemeanors as he struggled with bipolar disorder.

Federal money fund many existing courts. newbalance pas cher Blough has worked with a state senator and hopes that a bill can be introduced this year.

Criminal Records Leave Mentally Ill Struggling to Succeed

August 15th, 2014 Posted by Media, News Commentary 0 thoughts on “Criminal Records Leave Mentally Ill Struggling to Succeed”

April 15, 2014

The Post and Courier has written an extensive article on the state of mental health in South Carolina and throughout the US. The article follows the story of a man named Glen Yerkey who has bipolar, and is struggling to find work and to escape his criminal record. The article explains how the prisons in the US have become the new mental asylums in our country. A number of other experts and advocates weigh in on the article, including Rehinge’s Paton Blough. Comprehensive mental health reform is needed in the US, especially our corrections systems.

Read the Full Article on the Post and Courier Website

At 19, Glen Yerkey notched his first arrest, an act that branded him a criminal. Today, his rap sheet of thefts and petty crimes is so long, his stays behind bars so many, that he sees no meaningful future. New Balance Homme Yerkey is 26. chaussures new balance He can’t find a job or a place to live. With few options, he wonders how he can escape a life of crime. “I can’t stand it,” Yerkey, who’s living with his mother on James Island, said. “I’m disgusted with my situation.” Yerkey contends his problems, in large part, are rooted in his struggles with bipolar disorder. new balance pas cher For years, he has suffered manic highs (like the time he took an MUSC hospital bus on a joy ride) and severe lows (which he medicated with alcohol and illegal drugs). But like tens of thousands of mentally ill people across the nation, Yerkey’s troubles are often more apt to land him in a jail cell than in treatment. new balance 2018 Prisons and jails have become the new asylums for those who once might have ended up in psychiatric hospitals or other care, experts say. “There is a clear consensus that prisons are now the largest mental hospitals,” said Dr. Harold Morgan, a long-time forensic psychiatrist in Columbia who examined seriously ill inmates to take part in the recent class-action lawsuit against the state Department of Corrections. About 40 percent of people with serious mental illnesses today have been in jail or prison at some point, studies show. In South Carolina, at least five times more are in jails and prisons than in hospitals, a 2010 study by the nonprofit Advocacy Treatment Center and the National Sheriffs’ Association found. new balance pas cher 2018 Only three states – Nevada, Arizona and Texas – had higher rates. And when the advocacy center’s researchers released a new report about the problem last week, what did they have to say about South Carolina? “The state ranks near the bottom on availability of public psychiatric beds, efforts to divert mentally ill individuals, per capita state mental health expenditures, and almost every other measure of treatment for mentally ill individuals.”

Blough, who has bipolar disorder, spent one-third of his life from 2005 to 2008 behind bars or in psychiatric hospitals. new balance 2018 pas cher He’s seen the criminal justice system become the frontline of mental health care. He was arrested six times. Three times it went badly. Three times it went well. “The difference wasn’t me. I was fully manic in all six. The difference was the officers who dealt with me,” said Blough, now a married father in recovery. During one arrest, he spit on a detention officer. Another time he yelled threats against a local sheriff’s deputy. Both led to felony charges. Today, he deals with what he deems PTSD from being jolted with a stun gun, strapped to chairs, pepper sprayed and locked in isolation. He also gained a record of felonies. He blames a lack of hospital beds for those who need it. “Instead, it’s jail,” he said. “We criminalize the mentally ill.” Now, he’s an advocate and speaks to law enforcement groups and lawmakers. Blough didn’t set out to commit crimes. He believed he was waging nuclear war with China and that former President Bush was obeying his signals from a jail cell. He was trying to save the world. “It felt as real as the sky is blue,” Blough said. “It’s all from a mental health basis. It’s not a behavioral issue.

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  • “It has been one of my greatest rewards as NAMI Greenville, SC Program Director to see your recovery from when we first met to your award as NAMI South Carolina’s Recovery Person of the Year to your appearance on the same stage with author Pete Early. I hope your book is every bit as successful as his has been.”

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  • “It has been one of my greatest rewards as NAMI Greenville, SC Program Director to see your recovery from when we first met to your award as NAMI South Carolina’s Recovery Person of the Year to your appearance on the same stage with author Pete Early. I hope your book is every bit as successful as his has been.”

    Brian Lewis
    • Fletcher Mann
    • Program Director NAMI Greenville, SC
  • “It’s incredible. If you aren’t sure, always go for Cast. I don’t always clop, but when I do, it’s because of Cast. I made back the purchase price in just 48 hours!”

    Patrick Bates
    • Patrick Bates
    • CEO, SouthCentral
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