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Mental Health Advocacy – Remove Halloween Attractions Depicting Abuse of Mentally Ill

August 18th, 2016 Posted by Advocacy, Media, Published Media, Video 0 thoughts on “Mental Health Advocacy – Remove Halloween Attractions Depicting Abuse of Mentally Ill”

October 18th, 2016

Recently, Paton Blough has been working towards ending Halloween attractions that include portrayals of mentally ill individuals in asylums or prisons. Paton recently wrote an open letter to the Harvest of Horror at Denver Downs–an Upstate SC horror theme attraction for Halloween. vente de newbalance This year’s Harvest of Horror had stereotypical depictions of mentally ill prison inmates and asylum wards that are offensive and disturbing to mentally ill people and their loved ones. soldes new balance chaussures Paton’s letter, which you can read here, requested that the Harvest of Horror change their attraction and apologize to mentally ill individuals who live in the area. The director of Denver Downs did agree to make some modifications to the attraction to compromise with Paton. Paton was also featured on a news segment for WYFF News 4, which followed up on Paton after writing his letter, and he was able to state his mind on the situation. Paton was also able to write an op-ed piece for the Greenville News.

The time is now for mental health advocates and the general public to call for an end to Halloween attractions that include images of the mentally ill in asylums or prison infirmaries. A lot of effort has been made here in South Carolina and around the country in recent years to lessen the stigma and improve the lives of those living with a mental illness. However, there is much more left to do and Halloween attractions that exploit the mistreatment of the mentally ill in straight jackets, strapped to chairs or in prison infirmaries are all too real and add to the existing stigma. One of the attractions here in the Upstate has a prison theme complete with live actors in straight jackets and a room that depicts torturing the mentally ill. New Balance Baskets Femme If this were fictional it may be OK, unfortunately we know here in South Carolina this is not the case. Mental Health Advocates around the state fought for and won a landmark case known as the Judge Baxley order that has forced the S.C. acheter newbalance Department of Corrections to change its unconstitutional conditions for the mentally ill. newbalance pas cher The case outlined that inmates with bipolar and schizophrenia in some cases were spending more than five years in solitary confinement. The case graphically detailed how one inmate named Jerome Laudman died from lack of care surrounded by his rotting food trays and other things too disturbing to describe in this article. Thankfully the SC DOC has made many positive steps to the point of actually receiving an award from the National Alliance on Mental Illness for its positive response to this case. Unfortunately this case does not apply to county jails. Now, mental health advocates and the general public need this same leadership to openly denounce these stigmatizing Halloween attractions that take us backward, not forward. This is a civil rights injustice! Would you pay to entertain and “scare” yourself by seeing African American people being enslaved and tortured? Would you pay to entertain yourself by visiting an attraction that scared you by taking you through the Auschwitz concentration camp or that depicted the Trail of Tears? People do not choose to be mentally ill any more than someone chooses to have heart disease or cancer. Please stand up for the family of Jerome Laudman, others that have died and people like myself who have been in a straight jacket cuffed to a chair with a bag over my head, and demand public apologies from these attractions. There are other ways to scare people without exploiting and capitalizing on the civil injustices to a group of individuals. The writer is the founder of Rehinge and is a SC National Alliance on Mental Illness Board Member.

Paton was also featured in an article by the Washington Post on the issue as well, along side other mental health advocates throughout the nation. You can read the full article for this on the Washington Post’s website. Paton and Rehinge gives a big thanks to Colby Itkowitz for writing this fantastic article.

Paton Blough has been arrested during bipolar episodes. Chaussures NEW BALANCE An activist for mental-health awareness, Blough sent an impassioned letter to the owner of Denver Downs Farm in Anderson, S.C., after hearing about a Halloween attraction that showed a prisoner handcuffed and in a straitjacket. chaussures newbalance pas cher “Unfortunately, this is very real to me,” he said. “I’ve been strapped to beds and chairs in jails and hospitals.” Blough’s letter persuaded Ron Smith, director of operations for the farm’s entertainment venues, to remove that aspect of the attraction. “It really bothered him, so it wasn’t a big deal,” Smith said. “Some people thought it was silly, but regardless of what they thought, we didn’t even give it a second thought.

A Very Positive Hearing for H.5025 in the SC House Subcommittee

August 11th, 2016 Posted by Advocacy, Articles, Media, News Commentary, Published Media, Video 0 thoughts on “A Very Positive Hearing for H.5025 in the SC House Subcommittee”

March 11, 2016

Yesterday was an excellent day for SC House Bill H.5025 as it received a very positive hearing in front of the House committee. Paton Blough was a part of the hearing, and was also featured in a couple of local news outlets as they covered the bill. While H.5025 hasn’t passed in the House Committee yet, we are expecting that it will next week. Paton and Rehinge would also like to give a huge thank you to Mike Woody, the president of CIT International, and NAMI Indiana for their hard work on creating the Indiana bill, SB380, that laid out the blue print for Bill H.5025, the Crisis Intervention Team Training Act.

From WSPA News Channel 7

A South Carolina House subcommittee passed a bill Thursday morning that would change the way police handle people with mental illness. New Balance Baskets Officers would be required to go through much more training on crisis intervention, and they would no longer transport to mental hospitals people who are not a danger to themselves or others. soldes new balance chaussures Instead, ambulances could transport those patients. Bill sponsor Rep. New Balance Baskets Femme Bruce Bannister, R-Greenville, says, “I think mental illness is a health care issue, and in those cases where the mentally ill person is not an actual danger to himself or to other people, that that person should be transported in an ambulance and not in the back of a patrol car handcuffed.”

From The State Online News

Health care and police advocates appearing before a S.C. House subcommittee on Thursday pushed for new state laws they said would help de-escalate potentially explosive confrontations between police and mentally ill people. soldes newbalance Requiring police officers to have special training for dealing with the mentally ill would benefit both police and the mentally ill, said Paton Blough, 39, a Greenville resident who told subcommittee members of his six encounters with police while mentally troubled. soldes newbalance “Three of those arrests went well; three of those arrests turned violent. I believe the times I was calmly arrested had to do with the way officers dealt with me and not a difference in my mental state,” Blough said. “All six times, I was under the delusion I was a god and police were trying to murder me,” he said. “… The officers’ ability to slow down and control the situation through verbal techniques was the main factor in calming my fears of death.” In recent years, Blough’s personal experiences with mental illness have turned him into a state and national spokesman on ways to defuse confrontations between mentally ill people and police, who are often the first responders to calls concerning mentally ill people who might pose a danger to themselves or others. A board member of National Alliance on Mental Illness South Carolina, Blough now controls his illness through medication and various cognitive techniques. new balance sitemap The bill that Blough supports would set up “crisis intervention teams” operated through the sheriff’s department in each county, with specially trained officers who know how to deal with the mentally ill. new balance 2018 It would also require more training by law enforcement officers in how to deal with mentally ill people. “Law enforcement, health care, the (S.C.) Department of Mental Health — everyone who deals with or touches a mentally ill issue — would be part of a team to create a statewide crisis intervention program,” said Rep.

Paton on PBS – This is What It’s Like to be Arrested While Suffering Mental Illness

August 3rd, 2016 Posted by Advocacy, Media, Published Media, Video 0 thoughts on “Paton on PBS – This is What It’s Like to be Arrested While Suffering Mental Illness”

May 2nd, newbalance pas cher 2016

Paton was featured on the PBS News Hour last night where he was able to talk about his past with bipolar–mentioning his arrests and road to recovery. New Balance Baskets

Paton Blough has two labels he will have to bear for the rest of his life: “bipolar” and “convicted felon.” Having been arrested during his delusional episodes,

Al Jazeera Interview with Paton Blough

August 21st, 2015 Posted by Media, Published Media, Video 0 thoughts on “Al Jazeera Interview with Paton Blough”

Al Jeezera International interviewed Paton about his experiences as a person with mental illness in jail.

Climber Scales Table Rock Daily to Push Mental Health Court Bill

August 15th, 2015 Posted by Advocacy, Articles, Media, News Commentary, Published Media, Video 0 thoughts on “Climber Scales Table Rock Daily to Push Mental Health Court Bill”

April 15th, 2015

Paton and Rehinge made the front page of the Greenville News today with a wonderful article written by Liv Osby and photos taken by Heidi Heilbrunn. The article covers Paton’s recent journeys up Table Rock in order to push for SC House support for S.426, the Mental Health Court Program Act. This article has great exposure for this bill, and will help bring the issue more into the light in the Upstate. You can learn more about how to support the Mental Health Court Program Act here. soldes newbalance chaussures

Read the full article on the Greenville News website

day-05-01In 2006 after he was arrested on nonviolent charges, Blough went through mental health court. Though he dealt with a couple of issues since then, he said, he credits the experience with helping him come to grips with his illness. He got support from the National Alliance on Mental Illness, the right medication and therapy, he said. And for the past five years, he’s been an advocate for people with mental illness. The daily climb up Table Rock and back, which he said takes roughly three hours, is the latest effort in that advocacy. Blough starts out early in the morning on the trek, which begins with a gentle slope along a creek flanked by large mossy rocks before becoming more rugged and elevated in some sections. “Parts of it are pretty easy,” said the stay-at-home father of six, “though it’s steep in some places and 2,000 vertical feel and a little over 3 miles.” Sometimes he’s joined by supporters or his children. He believes he can continue until the bill becomes law. “I recognize I can’t keep it up for a year or whatever,” he said. new balance pas cher “But I think I can keep going.” The bill doesn’t mandate the courts, but it creates a statewide program with the provision that solicitors who take state dollars for such courts must create them within six months. While it doesn’t include any funding, its sponsor Sen. acheter newbalance Vincent Sheheen has said he hopes that money will be found in the budget at some point to help. Blough says that although it comes with no funds, he considers it a leadership bill. “I can’t say there will be a mental health court in every circuit in the next 12 months, but I think this is significant,” he said. “If it works, there’s no reason why we shouldn’t be expanding it in our state.”

Judge Debora Faulkner of Greenville County Probate Court said mental health court is successful because it costs far less than imprisoning someone and it turns their lives around. Since it began, it has accepted 84 participants, she said, and 55 have graduated. There are now eight active participants. “It’s a way to not only be prudent with tax dollars, but to get people the help that they need and out of that revolving door,” she said. “Those individuals are no longer in the criminal justice system. They are productive members of society.” Mental health courts operate in Greenville, Charleston and Columbia. Greenville’s began with a grant in 2005, Faulkner said. But for years it’s been operating without any funding because officials believe so much in it. Probate pays the judge’s time, she said, and other services are provided by Greenville Mental Health and Piedmont Mental Health employees. soldes newbalance “It’s a wonderful program. new balance Homme pas cher It’s a savings for the taxpayer, it keeps the jail population down, and I can’t tell you how grateful I am to see the results,” she said. “They’re all trying so hard. I saw someone have their very first paycheck. And another graduate who has gone on and gotten a master’s in social work.” Under the system, the solicitor selects the participants, who must meet certain criteria, like being charged with nonviolent offenses such as public disorderly or property crimes and have no past convictions for violent crimes, Faulkner said. They must attend mental health court weekly along with seeing a case manager and medical professionals, she said. They are also subject to random drug testing and can be terminated if they are rearrested or otherwise violate terms of the program. And they’re linked to community resources so they can find other help they might need, like employment and housing, she said.

Advocacy Alert for the Mental Health Court Program Act

August 13th, 2015 Posted by Advocacy, Articles, Media, News Commentary, Published Media, Video 0 thoughts on “Advocacy Alert for the Mental Health Court Program Act”

March 13th, 2015

An article and video published yesterday by WYFF News Channel 4 discusses the Mental Health Court Program Act and SC’s need for it. The article features Paton Blough and Senator Larry Martin of Pickens discussing the necessity of the bill in the state. Bill S.426 (formerly titled S.209), the Mental Health Court Program Act, is a bill designed to treat mentally ill criminals, rather than incarcerate them for actions that are often outside their control. This bill has been a crucial bi-partisan effort by Paton Blough and a number of SC politicians like Senator Vincent Sheheen (D) and Senator Larry Martin (R). You can watch the video on the WYFF Channel 4 website.

You can help us out in fighting for the Mental Health Court Program Act as well!

You can help us to fight for the passing of this bill by contacting the SC Senate Judiciary Committee! By contacting the following senators, you can encourage them to support S.426, the Mental Health Court Program Act in the Senate Judiciary Committee. By showing these senators your support for this bill, you are telling South Carolina that we NEED mental health courts and mental health reform in the state. Following is a list of the SC senators currently sitting on the Senate Judiciary Committee along with their contact information. Now is the time to act for mental health reform! Not sure what to say when you contact these senators? You can use this example letter/speech to help yourself out.

2015 Senate Judiciary Committee

Larry A. Martin (Chairman) SRulesComm@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6610 Room 101 Gressette Bldg. newbalance pas cher Dist. 2 – Pickens Lee Bright LeeBright@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6008 Room 602 Gressette Bldg. Dist. No. 12 – Greenville & Spartanburg George E. “Chip” Campsen, III ChipCampsen@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6340 Room 305 Gressette Bldg. Dist. 43 – Berkeley, Charleston & Collecton Creighton B. Coleman CreightonColeman@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6132 Room 508 Gressette Bldg. Chaussures NEW BALANCE Dist.17-Chester, Fairfield & York Ronnie A. Sabb RonnieSabb@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6032 Room 504 Gressette Bldg. Dist.32-Berkeley, Florence, Georgetown, Horry & Williamsburg Thomas D. Chaussures New Balance “Tom” Corbin TomCorbin@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6100 Room 501 Gressette Bldg. Dist. 5 – Greenville & Spartanburg Chauncey K. Gregory GregGregory@scsenate.gov 803-212-6024 Room 606 Gressette Bldg. Dist. 16 – Lancaster & York Cos. Greg Hembree GregHembree@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6016 Room 604 Gressette Bldg. Dist. 28 – Dillon & Horry A. Shane Massey ShaneMassey@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6024 Room 606 Gressette Bldg. Dist. 25 – Aiken, Edgefield, Lexington, McCormick & Saluda Cos. Luke A. Rankin SethicsComm@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6410 Room 205 Gressette Bldg. Dist. 33 – Horry Katrina Frye Shealy KatrinaShealy@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6108 Room 502 Gressette Bldg. Dist. 23- Lexington Paul Thurmond PaulThurmond@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6172 Room 513 Gressette Bldg. Dist. 41 – Charleston & Dorchester Ross Turner RossTurner@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6148 Room 512 Gressette Bldg. Dist. 8 – Greenville Tom Young, Jr. TomYoung@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6124 Room 506 Gressette Bldg. Dist. 24 – Aiken Sean Bennett SeanBennett@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6116 Room 601 Gressette Bldg. Dist. 7 – Berkeley, Charleston & Dorchester C. Bradley Hutto BradHutto@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6140 Room 510 Gressette Bldg. Dist. 40 – Allendale, Bamberg, Barnwell,Colleton, Hampton & Orangeburg Kevin L. Johnson KevinJohnson@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6048 Room 612 Gressette Bldg. Dist. 36 – Clarendon, Darlington, Florence & Sumter Gerald Malloy GeraldMalloy@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6172 Room 513 Gressette Bldg. Dist. 29 – Chesterfield, Darlington, Lee & Marlboro J. Thomas McElveen, III ThomasMcElveen@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6132 Room 508 Gressette Bldg. Dist. 35 – Kershaw, Lee, Richland & Sumter John L. Scott, Jr. JohnScott@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6124 Room 506 Gressette Bldg. acheter newbalance Dist. new balance sitemap 19 – Richland Karl B. Allen KarlAllen@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6040 Room 610 Gressette Bldg. Dist. 7 – Greenville Shane R. Martin ShaneMartin@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6100 Room 501 Gressette Bldg. Dist.13 – Greenville, Spartanburg & Union Marlon E. Kimpson marlonkimpson@scsenate.gov (803) 212-6056 Room 613 Gressette Bldg. Dist.

Paton in DC – Stepping Up for Mental Health

August 6th, 2015 Posted by Advocacy, Articles, Media, Published Media, Speaking Events, Video 0 thoughts on “Paton in DC – Stepping Up for Mental Health”

Paton Blough delivered a wonderful speech about his life with mental illness, his recovery and his advocacy efforts at the Stepping Up initiative in Washington DC. Paton had the honor of speaking along with Representative Patrick Kennedy and Senator Al Franken. newbalance 2018 Rep Kennedy, the head of the Kennedy Forum–an organization working toward lasting change in the way mental health and addictions are treated in our healthcare system. acheter newbalance en ligne Following are some highlights from Paton’s speech   paton-kennedy-dc What is Stepping Up? Stepping Up is a national initiative designed to push counties nationwide to work on access to mental health treatment and alternatives to jail for people with mental illnesses. new balance pas cher 2018 NAMI is working with a powerful coalition of national organizations, including the Council of State Governments Justice Center, the National Association of Counties, the American Psychiatric Foundation and numerous law enforcement, mental health and substance abuse organizations. Chaussures NEW BALANCE The initiative will challenge county, state and local leaders to work together to find solutions that work for the local community. Counties will be asked to follow a step-by-step process to build partnerships, assess current practices and develop a plan to implement research-based programs and services. newbalance 2018 It will also support local leaders by providing resources and examples of effective reforms and connecting them with other communities that are successfully reducing the number of people with mental illness in jails.

Rise In Police Shootings Coincides With Deep Cuts In Mental Health Spending

August 3rd, 2015 Posted by Advocacy, Articles, Media, News Commentary, Published Media, Video 0 thoughts on “Rise In Police Shootings Coincides With Deep Cuts In Mental Health Spending”

February 03, 2015

WSPA has written an excellent article and accompanying video on how mental health spending cuts has increased police shootings in South Carolina. newbalance pas cher WSPA.com

Read the full article on WSPA News 7 Website

John Pepper was killed by an Anderson County deputy in December 2014. 9-1-1 calls made by Pepper show he was armed, angry and suicidal. soldes new balance chaussures His death was the twelfth officer involved shooting in the Upstate that year and mental health experts said it was one of several that could have been prevented. chaussures newbalance pas cher Between 2009 and 2014, Upstate officer involved shootings shot up. Statistics from the SC State Law Enforcement Division show three such shootings in 2009. newbalance 2018 The same statistics show Upstate officers were involved in 16 shootings in 2011, 13 in 2012, 11 in 2013 and 12 in 2014. What changed? The I-Team reviewed the state statistics, police reports, 911 calls and witness statements looking for patterns in the shootings that could explain the increase including race, location and indeidentifyingracteristics of the suspects shot. Like John Pepper, most of the people shot by law enforcement were white. Chaussures NEW BALANCE In fact, all 12 of the people shot in the Upstate in 2014 were white. Based on the most recent population numbers, the place where officer involved shootings were most likely was Anderson County where the incidents happen at nearly twice the rate of Greenville, Spartanburg or Cherokee Counties. One trait that stood out from the data, officers were called again and again into armed confrontations with someone suffering from mental illness. Cherokee County Sheriff Steve Mueller said his officers encounter mental illness daily. new balance pas cher “I think you’d see some decrease in the numbers if we could properly treat the people with mental disease in our community,” Mueller said. Mueller said his deputies might have two or more calls in a single day to take a mentally ill patient to the hospital. He said funding cuts to mental health services leave his officers as the first line of communication with some patients.

Welcome to Rehinge Video

October 13th, 2014 Posted by Advocacy, Media, Published Media, Video 0 thoughts on “Welcome to Rehinge Video”

Check out the new Rehinge welcome video!

SC Could Expand Mental Health Court Program

August 15th, 2014 Posted by Advocacy, Media, News Commentary, Speaking Events, Video 0 thoughts on “SC Could Expand Mental Health Court Program”

April 15, 2014

Paton Blough of Rehinge spoke in front of the Greenville County Delegation last night on the topic of mental health courts. Paton is pushing for South Carolina to adopt more mental health courts in each county of the state. new balance pas cher This expansion of mental health courts would reduce recidivism rates of mentally ill inmates and also save the state millions of dollars. new balance sitemap

Watch and Read the Full Article at WSPA News Channel 7

A Greenville mental health advocate spoke with lawmakers Monday night to raise support for more mental health courts in South Carolina. Chaussures NEW BALANCE Right now, there are three in Greenville, Richland and Charleston counties. vente de newbalance The courts allow non-violent mentally ill offenders to meet with a judge and sign up for treatment.

Paton Blough graduated from Greenville’s mental health court several years ago. new balance Homme pas cher “I believe the program was a big part of my recovery without a doubt,” Blough said. solde newbalance map Blough faced some misdemeanors as he struggled with bipolar disorder.

Federal money fund many existing courts. newbalance pas cher Blough has worked with a state senator and hopes that a bill can be introduced this year.

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Rehinge exists to provide hope, education, and spiritual inspiration for all people affected with mental health issues and to fight stigma while pushing for global mental health reform.

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  • “It has been one of my greatest rewards as NAMI Greenville, SC Program Director to see your recovery from when we first met to your award as NAMI South Carolina’s Recovery Person of the Year to your appearance on the same stage with author Pete Early. I hope your book is every bit as successful as his has been.”

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  • “It has been one of my greatest rewards as NAMI Greenville, SC Program Director to see your recovery from when we first met to your award as NAMI South Carolina’s Recovery Person of the Year to your appearance on the same stage with author Pete Early. I hope your book is every bit as successful as his has been.”

    Brian Lewis
    • Fletcher Mann
    • Program Director NAMI Greenville, SC
  • “It’s incredible. If you aren’t sure, always go for Cast. I don’t always clop, but when I do, it’s because of Cast. I made back the purchase price in just 48 hours!”

    Patrick Bates
    • Patrick Bates
    • CEO, SouthCentral
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